By Inside Archery Staff

Now is about time to begin thinking about early season whitetail preparation if you’re serious about tagging a giant buck. Plan your next whitetail season accordingly, and make this summer count by preparing for the season.

1. SCOUTING

First thing first, pick a suitable spot that you can revisit often such as public hunting land, urban bowhunting zones and small private parcels. Scour the land to locate trails, food sources, bedding areas and water holes. Scouting a buck’s home early allows him to settle down and forget about your intrusion long before you plan to hunt the location. Thorough scouting will provide an overview of how deer are using the property and how you can intercept them in a narrow time frame.

Look for trails, mast crops, agricultural fields, water holes and other deer attractants. Farmsteads, both abandoned and active, tend to be hubs of whitetail activity. They generally have good habitat surrounding them and ample food nearby, and the buzz of the normal farm goings-on allows a savy hunter to slip in undetected. Set up trail cams in your favorite spots, and watch the pattern of the deer and track the big bucks. FOOD PLOTS

2. FOOD PLOTS

Everyone talks about having huge food plots nowadays, but the fact is that you don’t necessarily need a giant plot to achieve the same goals. If you can’t organize a large-scale farming project for deer, you can still enjoy food-plot benefits with smaller, easily managed plots. Garden-sized food plots less than an acre in size do provide ample attraction to garner the attention of whitetails at your favorite backyard bowhunting location. Huge food plots are great for holding lots of deer, but the fact is that much smaller food plots are often better when hunting mature bucks. Mini food plots can be positioned anywhere including where a mature buck feels safest.

Locating sites for smaller food plots simply requires scouting for treestand locations in funnels, inside of wood edges and along ridges. Some things to think about when you find the perfect area that appears to have big buck activity: Is there ample soil amounts? Does enough sunlight reach the plot? Can you scratch the ground enough to plant a seed? Will the area receive enough moisture? Plant your plot in the late summer to early season otherwise the deer may trim off the choicest morsels before the season even begins.

3. TREESTANDS

Finally, setting up your stand ahead of time can prove beneficial to your hunt. Hanging a stand can be a timely affair, so why bother when you can set it up ahead of time. The extra noise and ruckus can be handled long before you want to tag your buck. By this time that disturbance will be long forgotten and you can make sure your stand is secured in the perfect spot.

Thorough planning for the whitetail season is very effective and ensures you the best shot at those big bucks. Get started early, and tag the buck of a lifetime.